Monday, July 24, 2017

PROGRAM - JULY 5, 2017 - KEN BUCK

Greater Cincinnati Watercolor Society
Program Notes         
7:00 pm July 5, 2017

Our Program Chair, Claudia Taylor, introduced our July program presenter, Ken Buck.
Ken Buck
Ken is a very accomplished local artist, with memberships and signatures in multiple regional and national societies for both watercolor and pastels.  He has been published in many periodicals, books and magazines.  He has produced wonderful scenes of people swimming in pools and vivid floral scenes.  He teaches classes six days a week at the Art Academy and at The Baker-Hunt Art & Cultural Center.  Ken maintains his studio at the Pendleton Art Center.  They have an open house in October/November/December.  Ken noted that they are always looking for artists to show in the hallways during the Pendleton shows.


Ken described his preferred materials and tools:
·         His favorite papers are Jack Richeson, Arches and Lanaquarelle.  He chooses rough, cold press paper for bite to take pastels better.
·         He used a 1/2” Coffman flat brush during the demo.  He likes the brush because he has a good sense of how much paint it holds.  He also prefers synthetic brushes, choosing to avoid animal hairs.
·         Ken has thousands of pastels of all brands to assure a wide variety of colors and tints.
·         Ken emphasized using professional quality watercolors for longevity of color steadfastness.



For the program presentation, Ken explained that he would lay down a loose watercolor underpainting and overlay with pastel drawing and detailing.  Ken’s chosen scene was a woodland scene, with multiple vertical tree trunks breaking a colorful late summer/fall mix of colors.  As Ken worked through the watercolor underpainting, he outlined many of his general views of art, life and his passion as a cat whisperer.  After he completed the watercolor underpainting, he used a hair dryer to speed up the process before moving into the pastel work.
·         When he glazes in watercolor, Ken generally works in one direction.  When using watercolor as an underpainting, the direction is not important.
·         Ken doesn’t like to use black or gray tints in his work.  He prefers to mix grays with complementary colors that form the palette of a particular piece he is working on.  He believes that black kills the life in a painting.
·         Ken likes to push the application of color as far as he can during his work. 
·         Abstract painting is not an interest of Ken’s.  He believes that every painting has pieces and parts of the painting that are abstract in their individual nature, contributing to the overall composition.
·         Ken often searches and defines the darkest value in a painting as soon as possible.  It helps to define the range of values within the painting, by which to measure other color values.
·         Ken pointed out that oil-based pastels, such as Caran d’Ache, cannot be used with other pastels.
·         Pastels are not chalk. 
·         When working with pastels, one’s hands must be kept clean and dry.
·         Ken works hard to keep a balance of values in the overall composition of a painting.
·         He works vertically with watercolors and pastels.  When working with Yupo paper, one must work.
·         Ken enjoys setting a mix of watercolors in the underpainting that form rich grays and then layering accents of bright pastels over these gray areas.




Ken displayed and explained various techniques in his demo and as part of his approach in his work.
·         Ken worked very quickly as he put in his underpainting of watercolor.  He explained that it was merely to set the tone of colors for the composition.  Each color area would have varying degrees of pastel overlay.  Sometimes he left most of the watercolor come through and other times, he deepened the color area with heavy blends of pastels.
·         He explained that it is critical to let the watercolor dry before beginning the pastel work to keep the pastel looking fresh.
·         As Ken worked with the pastels, he would lightly blend the colors with his fingertips as needed to achieve softer or harder tones or edges.
·         Ken explained that he checks the values of the piece throughout the development of his work.  One thing he does is to squint, which blurs the detail into areas of color, allowing him to evaluate the values as he goes. 
·         Another trick is to view the painting in a mirror to look for shapes that don’t work. 
·         Ken will utilize a venetian blind to modulate the intensity of light hitting a painting as he reviews it. 
·         Ken also explained that it is possible to lift watercolor with dry brush before it is dry.  Pastels can also be lifted with stiff brush or kneaded eraser.
·         Upon finishing a pastel piece for shipping to a show, Ken uses Sennelier Latour Pastel spray fix.  He warns that application of a spray fix should be a single layer spray.  If too much spray is used, it can soak an area of pastel and darken the color in an undesirable way.




Ken recommended checking out artist Raymond Kelley for his pastel over watercolors.

Ken concluded his program with a review and critique of Club member paintings. 

For our next Greater Cincinnati Watercolor Society meeting on August 2nd, we will be meeting at the Barn prior to setting and hanging the GCWS Show.  See you then.

Submitted by Tom Schroeder, Secretary, Greater Cincinnati Watercolor Society, July 2017.

Monday, July 17, 2017

MINUTES - JULY 5, 2017


Greater Cincinnati Watercolor Society

Meeting Notes           

7:00 pm July 5, 2017

President Kathy Lang called the meeting to order. 

We would like to welcome visitors, Pam Bost, (a beginning watercolorist from North Carolina who was visiting her cousin, Claudia Taylor), Nancy Schwartz and Sharon Hewer to the club meeting this month.

Announcements

·         Fall Workshop Chairman, Pat Lester reported that this year’s workshop will be held on Oct 27 and 28.  She is interested in having Chris Campbell, of Indiana, come to give the workshop this year.   It would be a two day event with Chris.  Chris is known as a very hands on teacher who works well with artists and is open to the interests of the participants.

Mary Fleischmann, our Annual Exhibit Chair, reminded everyone of the details for our upcoming Club Exhibition:

·         This year the sitters will also be encouraged to paint while they sit.

·         One person of each sitting pair will need a smart phone and download the app for electronic payment for paintings that sell during their sitting time.

·         Aug 2nd will be our meeting date, followed by the show hanging.  Tom Schroeder has agreed to set the show this year.  Every painting will be in the best spot!!

·         On Aug 5th the show will start

·         The show reception will occur on Sunday, Aug. 6th, from 1-4.

·         This year’s judge will be Rachel Rubin Wolf, who was our presenter from the April meeting.

·         Deb Ward will do name tags for the paintings.

·         The show ends Sunday, Aug. 27th.  Paintings can be picked up on August 29th between 10-12.  Paintings can also be picked up Sunday at the end of the session.

·         The Anderson Senior Center will tour the exhibit.  This year, to assist with the presentation of the show during the tour, each exhibiting artist provide a write up of their paintings with entries.

·         On Aug 20th, there will be music by the Cincinnati Chamber Orchestra at the Barn during our show.  Carol Fencl has agreed to stay after her sitting to be present while people cross over from the music to see our work.

·         The Barn typically takes 20% commission on sales of paintings during the show.  It is the responsibility of the artist to make this connection with The Barn.

The August 2nd meeting will be an informal, open Q & A session with coffee and donuts.  There will be no invited presentation.  This is an opportunity for you to ask questions about what you or others are working on with your work.

As announced last month by Nancy Wisely, our Scholarship Chair, this year’s Scholarship Award winner is Madison De Atley.  She will be present at our August meeting to receive her award and will also submit two of her paintings to be part of our show.  We will feature her paintings at the beginning of our show.

Membership report by Lydia Rittinger, announced one new member, a former program presenter from earlier this year, Heidi Hanssen.  Welcome Heidi!  We do want to announce that new membership dues are reduced to $25 starting in August.  The new Club membership directory was sent out via email earlier this spring.  If you still need a printed copy please contact Lydia or Kathy. 



Submitted by Tom Schroeder, Secretary, Greater Cincinnati Watercolor Society, July 2017.

Monday, June 26, 2017

PROGRAM - JUNE 7, 2017

Heidi Hanssen
In the absence of our Program Chair, Claudia Taylor, Tom Schroeder introduced our June program presenter, Heidi Hanssen.

Heidi has a BFA Cum Laude from Ohio Wesleyan University and a MA in Art Education from Indiana University.  Even before her formal studies, Heidi has always had a keen interest in art.  After a career in teaching, sharing this interest with her students, Heidi is pursuing her dream of being a full-time artist.  She has chosen to develop her skills further in watercolor by attending workshops taught be accomplished watercolorists.

Heidi has shown her paintings at the Transparent Watercolor Society International Show, Ohio Watercolor Society and the Viewpoint Show, twice winning awards.  Most recently she won first award at the Cincinnati Woman’s Art Club Annual Show.  She is a Signature member of the Cincinnati Art Club and the Women’s Art Club.

Heidi has also worked in ceramics.  She stated that at one point she painted a painting for her husband and then decided to take classes from Ken Buck, which rekindled her interest in painting again.  

Heidi has taken workshops from John Salminen, from Duluth, Minnesota; Mary Whyte from Charleston, South Carolina and Janet Rogers of Ormond Beach, Florida.

From each instructor, she has learned tips of using a variety of tools and techniques that she shared with us.

John Salminen equipment tips and techniques:
·         Masking tape can be the cheap, basic kind from a hardware store.  Only use on dry, unpainted white paper.  If used on painted areas, additional paint can leach through the edges.  It is better to dry brush against the edge.  It can also be cut like a stencil.  Heidi demonstrated how thin lines can be masked and the color scrubbed off;
·         John recommends using a thin, snap-off blade knife to delicately cut fine and curved lines out of the masking tape without cutting the paper;
·         Magic Eraser by Mr. Clean works very well to lift color from watercolor paper.  Color should be scrubbed gently as needed to remove color.  Heidi passed out samples to the Club members;
·         John uses a mouth atomizer, which acts as a low tech airbrush to apply watercolor in a fine mist to areas of the painting.  They can be sourced on Cheap Joes or Amazon.
   

Other tools:
·         Janet Rogers recommended Loew Cornell brushes.  They keep a long point and have a good snap and are reasonably priced.
·         Heidi suggests buying big soft brushes, such as Silver Brushes or Princeton synthetic squirrel brushes.  She has also started using larger mop brushes to hold more paint and allow for thin line application.  She has also used Escoda and Danube brushes.
·         Heidi likes to use a small fan brush to paint fine lines to soften an edge. 
·         She also uses flat brushes to lift paint along an edge.
·         Heidi demonstrated how ruling pens can be used very effectively for applying masking fluid provides thin lines.
·         Heidi uses value cards to compare values of colors against each other as well as understanding values from reference pictures.  She also uses a punched white card to assist the comparison of a color to a value against the white of the card.
·         Mary Whyte recommended use of Gator Board for painting surface, for resistance to water, light weight and cost.
·         Automotive tape can be used for masking fine lines.
·         Clear Wet Media Film can be used to overlay a painting and experiment with wash tones to work out next steps of a painting.

Some lessons learned from the workshops about painting and process:
·         Backgrounds should be painted first to set the tone or lighting mood for the foreground subject.  Backgrounds can also be very light, partial gestural or dark.

John Salminen
·         In urban street scenes, chose an idea that conveys depth;
·         Skies are comprised of more than one color, borrowed from the palette of the landscape;
·         John likes to paint wet surfaces.  For wet streets, remember it acts like a mirror so reverse the image top to bottom, not side to side;
·         Mix up large amounts of color for washes;
·         Uses a mouth atomizer for textural treatment;
·         He uses a great variety of tinted overlays to help determine how to wash or atomize the tone of an area.



Janet Rodgers
·         Uses blotches of color areas in overlay fashion;
·         Create several warm and cool color mixtures and use them together, mixing on the paper;
·         Practice making interesting color mixes on scrap paper;
·         Use shapes of the background as a “gesture” to highlight the colors of the figure;
·         Likes Lowell Cornell brushes, longer tip and stiff;
·         Emphasized working on scraps of paper for color mixes of skin tones.

Mary Whyte portraiture is big inspiration for techniques.
·         Loves to use hats on figures, casts shadows, anchors faces
·         Mary uses Perylene Maroon as one of her favorite colors;
·         Paint skin warm skin tones and then overlay with cool shadows;
·         Avoid symmetry;
·         Work on background as you paint figure.
      

Heidi also pointed out that the internet is a great source of references and blogs for inspiration.  A couple of her favorite blogs are:
·         Gurney Journey
·         Seamless Expressions

She also stated that all of the national and regional society shows display the winning paintings on their individual websites for study.
Heidi was a great source of ideas, techniques and process, giving us much to review and practice in our own work. 

Heidi concluded her program with a review and critique of Club member paintings. 

For our next Greater Cincinnati Watercolor Society meeting on July 5th, we will be hosting Ken Buck in an evening meeting.  The meeting will start with a Potluck dinner followed by the program at 7:00.  See you then.

Submitted by Tom Schroeder, Secretary, Greater Cincinnati Watercolor Society, June 2017.



Monday, June 19, 2017

MINUTES - JUNE 7, 2017

Greater Cincinnati Watercolor Society
Program Notes          
10:00 am June 7, 2017


In the absence of President Kathy Lang, the Secretary, Tom Schroeder called the meeting to order. 

We welcome visitors, Pam Zeller and Cathy Parkinson to the meeting.  They are students of Marilyn Bishop.  We also welcome Sukhwa Kahl to the club this month.

Announcements
  • Yuki Hall has a workshop in Evendale from 10-4 on June 24th.  The cost of the workshop is $50.
  • The Plaza has workshops on Thursdays from 1-3.
  • We still need a Hospitality Chairman for the GCWS Show at the Barn.  If you can help, please contact Kathy Lang.

Fall Workshop Chairman, Pat Lester, reported that this year’s workshop will be held on Oct 27, 28 and 29.  She opened it up to the membership for input for topic of workshop that they would be interested in.  Make your requests known to Pat.

Annual Exhibit – We wanted to reiterate the details from the previous notes with updates:

Mary Fleischmann discussed details for our upcoming Club Exhibition:
  • ·         This year the sitters will also be encouraged to paint while they sit.
  • ·         One person of each sitting pair will need a smart phone and download the app for electronic payment for paintings that sell during their sitting time.
  • ·         Aug 2nd will be our meeting date, followed by the show hanging. 
  • ·         On Aug 5th the show will start
  • ·         The show reception will occur on Sunday, Aug. 6th, from 1-4.
  • ·         This year’s judge will be Rachel Rubin Wolf, who was our presenter from the April meeting.
  • ·         Deb Ward will do name tags for the paintings.
  • ·         The show ends Sunday, Aug. 27th.  Paintings can be picked up at the end of the day - or – final pickup on Tuesday, August 29 from 10-noon.
  • ·         The Anderson Senior Center will tour the exhibit.  This year, to assist with the presentation of the show during the tour, each exhibiting artist provide a write up of their paintings with entries.
  • ·         On Aug 20th, there will be music by the Cincinnati Chamber Orchestra at the Barn during our show.  Carol Fencl has agreed to stay after her sitting to be present while people cross over from the music to see our work.
  • ·         During the July meeting, there will be an update for the credit card reader.
  • ·         The Barn typically takes 20% commission on sales of paintings during the show.  It is the responsibility of the artist to make this connection with The Barn.
  • ·         There will be postcards for this year’s show in the same style as last year’s show, showing the winning entries.  These postcards have been distributed and left at the Barn.

The July 5th meeting will be held in the evening.  We will incorporate a pot-luck dinner into the beginning of the meeting.  The dinner will start at 6:30, with the program starting at 7:00.   The program presenter will be Ken Buck.   Kathy Lang will be sending an email with information.

The August 2nd meeting will be an informal, open Q & A session with coffee and donuts.  There will be no invited presentation.  This is an opportunity for you to ask questions about what you or others are working on with your work.

Nancy Wisely, our Scholarship Chair announced that this year’s Scholarship Award winner is Madison Diopoly.  She will be present at our August meeting to receive her award and will also submit two of her paintings to be part of our show.

Membership report by Lydia Rittinger, noted no new memberships.  We do want to announce that new membership dues are reduced to $25 starting in August.  The new Club membership directory was sent out via email earlier this spring.  If you still need a printed copy please contact Lydia or Kathy.  Lydia reported that our Club membership is at 78 members.

Connie Dettmer announced that our income for this month is due to membership fee intake.  Expenses occurred through our costs for the upcoming show and our typical meeting expenses.  


Submitted by Tom Schroeder, Secretary, Greater Cincinnati Watercolor Society, June 2017.

Wednesday, May 17, 2017

PROGRAM - MAY 3, 2017 - PEGGY BISHOP

Greater Cincinnati Watercolor Society
Program Notes          
10:00 am May 3, 2017
 
Peggy Bishop
Program Chair, Claudia Taylor introduced our May program presenter, Peggy Bishop.  Peggy credits her love of watercolor to her mother, our own Marilyn Bishop.  Peggy has established her own watercolor path and we were pleased to see her range of skills.  Peggy lives near Lexington, Kentucky and her career has ranged over numerous directions such as chemistry, micro-biology, cancer research and programming.

She loves to travel and collect images along her trails for future paintings.  She counts the South Carolina lowlands and Bluegrass countryside as influences for many of her pieces.

In the past, Peggy has also painted detailed still lifes of crystal glass among other subjects.  Her current interest has led to working in urban landscapes.  She has studied in workshops with Paul Jackson, a renowned colorist; Iain Stewart, famed architectural illustrator/artist and Keiko Tanabe, whose portfolio features many international landscape subjects.  These influences have moved Peggy to working looser.  One of her current influences is Jeremy Mann, and oil painter who works in deep value cityscapes and night scenes.

Peggy described her typical process in organizing her reference images for a painting. 
She likes to use an IPad to modify the qualities of photos.  She applies various filters to an image to dial up or down the value, saturation and hue as well as focus, texture and pattern.




For her presentation, Peggy continued to work on an in-progress aerial perspective scene as viewed from the Space Needle tower in downtown Seattle.   She chose to use a painting that was already started so that we could see some of the critical steps of her painting process in the short time of the demonstration.  This is a painting subject that she has painted before in demonstrations in an exploration of patterns, colors, values and emphasis.  The focus of her exploration in this demo is to better establish the center of interest.





 This Seattle scene carefully established prominent city streets as the organizing compositional element, shifting a key intersection, off center into the lower left Law of Thirds point of the painting.   She originally started with gradient washes for the building shapes, followed by delineation of the materials and shapes of the window patterns.  In some cases, she utilized masking tape to set key edges and highlights.  For the majority of the painting, she painted the building lines free hand so it wouldn’t look too tight throughout the piece.  As she demonstrated some parts of her technique, Peggy explained that she likes to scumble pigment into areas of the painting to develop texture.  She will also drop pigment into wet lines for variation.  She explained that her use of soft and hard edges varies with the image and her emphasis of the center of interests within each piece.  Some buildings/windows were done painting negatively to maintain the light building color against the darker window.








The base color palette for this demo piece created the majority of the painting.  She utilized a special accent color, June Bug Blue, as a turquoise glow for the feature building against the Thalo Blue color tint of the overall cityscape to punch her center of interest.  This worked successfully to add interest, accent and variation of hue, all reinforcing her composition.  In her use of color, Peggy says that she typically likes to work with a lot of color, but in this case, the minimal color palette set up her composition.  Her approach to value is to include deep, dark values at an early point in her painting process.  It allows her to measure the rest of the values of the painting against the darkest parts.

She works with a variety of paint manufacturers depending on the quality of the paint color.  In this demo painting, Peggy has a very limited palette, utilizing Raw Sienna, Thalo Blue, Windsor Newton Neutral Tint (has a blueish cast), June Bug Blue (American Journey Paints) and Cad Red accents. 




Peggy doesn’t mind using cheap brushes for certain techniques.  She also uses the Princeton Neptune No. 8, a Paul Jackson Kayak Brush and a synthetic Robert Simmons white sable among others.

Peggy used a hair dryer to facilitate the workability of some portions of painting for demo.

We certainly enjoyed watching Peggy’s process as she took us through her thinking as she deftly delineated this complex urban streetscape scene.  I’m sure we will see Peggy again and catch up with her current projects in her journey in watercolor.



For our next Greater Cincinnati Watercolor Society meeting on June 7th, we will be hosting Heidi Hanssen, another prominent local watercolor artist as she shows us how she achieves her wonderful compositions and gorgeous realism.  See you then.


Submitted by Tom Schroeder, Secretary, Greater Cincinnati Watercolor Society, April 2017.

Wednesday, May 10, 2017

MINUTES - MAY 3, 2017

Greater Cincinnati Watercolor Society
Program Notes          
10:00 am May 3, 2017

President Kathy Lang called the meeting to order.  New visitors to the Club were asked to introduce themselves.  
Jennie Kim who is from Minnesota, has attended previously, and is now a member.  Jennie presented one of her paintings for critique later in the meeting and it was a great taste of more to come from Jennie.  
Gary Brooks is a former principal and art teacher – has worked with John Ruthven and Gary Akers.  Gary has exhibited in various shows such as the Ohio Watercolor Society and hopefully will become a regular visitor at our meetings and a future member.  
Heidi Hanssen, the next month’s presenter, visited to get a better understanding of how our meetings run.  Heidi is very accomplished and is also local to Cincinnati.  Not only will she deliver a terrific presentation next month, we hope she feels welcome to also become a regular to our Club. 

Announcements
·          Mary Fleischmann stated that at Findlay market, there is the Phil Rowland show, a (6) week display of his drawings which show large representations of Cincinnati neighborhoods.  This display will be up until May 19th
 ·         The Queen City Art Club will exhibit their work at the Fairfield Community Arts Center in downtown Fairfield from May 20 to June 24.
 ·         Wyoming will host their 2017 Art Show and Competition at the Civic Center on May 21st.
 ·         Yuki Hall will host a workshop at The Barn on the weekend of May 19-21.  This workshop is sold out.
 ·         Mount Adams will host their Art Walk on May 13th.
 ·         Tom Schroeder, Robert Thornburgh and Heidi Hanssen announced that their works were accepted into the 2017 Ohio Watercolor Society Show.  The show will run from June 30th to September 10th.  
Kathy Lang announced that Connie Dettmer has accepted the role of Treasurer for our Club.

 Our July meeting will be an evening meeting scheduled for 6:30.  There will be a pot luck dinner prior to our meeting.  More details on this at our next meeting.

Annual Exhibit
 Mary Fleischmann discussed details for our upcoming Club Exhibition:
·         This year the sitters will also be encouraged to paint while they sit.
·         One person of each sitting pair will need a smart phone and download the app for electronic payment for paintings that sell during their sitting time.
·         Aug 2nd will be our meeting date, followed by the show hanging.
·         On Aug 5th the show will start
·         The show reception will occur on Sunday, Aug. 6th, from 1-4.
·         This year’s judge will be Rachel Rubin Wolf, who was our presenter from the April meeting.
·         Deb Ward will type name tags for the paintings.
·         The show ends Sunday, Aug. 27th, when paintings can be picked up on Tuesday, Aug. 29th  between 10am and noon.  Paintings can also be picked up Sunday at the end of the session.
·         The Anderson Senior Center will tour the exhibit.  This year, to assist with the presentation of the show during the tour, each exhibiting artist is encouraged to provide a write up of their paintings with entries.
·         On Aug 20th, there will be music by the Cincinnati Chamber Orchestra at the Barn immediately following our show.  Carol Fencl has agreed to stay after her sitting to be present while people cross over from the music to see our work.
·         Next month there will be an update for the credit card reader.
·         The Barn typically takes 20% commission on sales of paintings during the show.  It is the responsibility of the artist to make this connection with The Barn.
·         There will be postcards for this year’s show in the same style as last year’s show, showing the winning entries.

Nancy Wisely announced that she will give the Scholarship presentation at the August meeting, a $500 gift.  The winning student will also be invited to display their artwork at the show.

Membership report by Lydia Rittenger. 
The member roster will be sent out by email this year.  Hard copies are available to those that can’t receive email. 
Please send membership checks to Kathy Lang until further notice. 


Submitted by Tom Schroeder, Secretary, Greater Cincinnati Watercolor Society, May 2017.